Boston’s Olympic Bid Is Dead!

After terrific organizing by No Boston Olympics the pro-bid mayor of Boston announced today that he would NOT sign the Host City Contract required of all candidate cities by the IOC. We called it “The Blank Check” because that’s what it is. No sign. No bid. Way to go, NBO!

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Chicago Tribune Sees Light – Six Years Later

Chicago dodges its funeral+logoHoly cow! Where was Phil and the Chicago Tribune in 2009? You can read Phil’s amazing piece here.

You can download it as a PDF along with Tom’s somewhat aggravated reply here.

When the decision to award the 2016 Games to Rio was announced we said “Chicago didn’t just dodge a bullet – we dodged a cannonball.” We like Phil’s headline better.

Keep it up!

Olympic Bid Terrible News For Boston

Prof. Zimbalist should know. His 2015 book, “Circus Maximus: The Economic Gamble Behind Hosting the Olympics and World Cup,” was just released by The Brookings Institute. Read his commentary…

Terrible News

World Cup Rip Off

Every time you hear the word World Cup think “Olympics” and every time you hear “FIFA” think International Olympic Committee!

The No Games Story In 5 Minutes

Thanks to Prof. Lisa Dush at DePaul and her digital storytelling students for helping Tom Tresser to pull this video together.

Who Profits From Olympics?

From CBC News, a great article, “Winner’s Curse? The Economics of Hosting the Olympic Games” – we might’ve re-titled it, “Loser’s Blessing”! – includes this video of a news segment reporting how the major corporate sponsors of the games, who pay around $100 million each, make huge profits from their association with the games and by supplying the operators with goods and services.

We Said That In 2009

An article from The Guardian on the 2012 London Olympics is titled “Will the Olympics get the economy growing again? Don’t bank on it.” It points out the academic research that shows (and showed back in 2008) that hosting mega-events is a stupid economic develpment plan. The article concludes

Professor Stefan Szymanski, a specialist in the economics of sport at the University of Michigan, says the body of academic evidence shows “pretty conclusively” there are negligible economic benefits to hosting a major sporting event although it can be fantastic for a country’s morale. “Governments want to host these events because they are highly prestigious and hugely popular with the electorate,” says Szymanski. “If you tell me you’re going to have a party, that’s great – but if you tell me you’re going to have a party and get rich at the same time, then I’m not going to believe you.”

That’s pretty much how we called it in 2009.